Wednesday Wisdom

Healthy Living Tips and Tricks from your friends at Brickhouse!

The 5 Worst Pieces of Fitness Advice

5 outdated, inaccurate or just plain lousy tips you’re better off ignoring

By Joe Donatelli

In this article from Livestrong the author lists out 5 pieces of bad fitness advice. You can read the whole article here.

1. “If You Want to Lose Weight, You Have to Exercise”

THE TRUTH: If you want to lose weight, eating healthier foods and ingesting fewer calories is key. To give yourself an edge, find a weight-loss buddy.

2. “No Pain, No Gain”

THE TRUTH: Moderate exercise for 40 minutes, four to five times a week, is all you need to glean the health benefits of exercise, Otto says. Walking, jogging, dancing, swimming, volleyball, touch football, and shooting baskets all count as “moderate exercise.” Even some common chores meet the requirements. For a list of moderate exercises and the length of time they should be done, copy and paste this URL into your browser (after you finish this article, of course): http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/lose_wt/phy_act.htm

PS – working out with friends is fun though – and will keep you motivated!

3. “You Can Build Long, Lean Muscles”

“There has always been a misconception that weightlifting and resistance training will make you big and bulky,” Doll says. “What nobody thinks about is that, from a pure anatomical standpoint, the idea of making your muscles longer is impossible. The joint distance never changes. The physiology behind that is pretty simple yet they think, ‘Pilates or this machine will make my muscles long and sleek.'”

If the marketing was true, people who did Pilates would look like Plastic Man.

THE TRUTH: Whether it’s Pilates or pushups, the adaptation of the muscle tissue does not change. Muscle bulk only happens with intense workouts coupled with protein and/or other supplements.

4. “You Gotta Carbo-Load, Bro!”

“Unless you’re going to physically exert yourself for more than 90 minutes the next day, you really don’t need to think about carbo-loading,” says Nancy Clark, RD, author of Nancy Clark’s Sports Nutrition Guidebook.

THE TRUTH: To prepare for a big event, the best strategy is to continue eating your normal, healthy sports diet (a plate filled with two-thirds grain, starches, veggies, and fruits, and one-third protein) while cutting back on training, Clark says. “By taking a rest day, your muscles have the time they need to store those carbs that you eat instead of burning them off in yet another workout.”

This is one reason why high school, college, and NFL teams have easy practices the day before a game. Besides letting aches and pains heal, athletes’ bodies are able to store carbs for energy.

5. “The Best Time to Work Out is Morning/Night”

THE TRUTH: The best time to work out is whenever you most feel like exercising and/or can fit it into your schedule, Dr. Otto says. “There is some research suggesting that the time of day you work out may give you better performance should you also compete at that time, but these effects are subtle.”

What bad advice have you ever gotten? Tell us about it on our Facebook page —>>> HERE!

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